Review of coronary in-stent restenosis and its risk factors
Received:August 28, 2020  
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DOI:10.11915/j.issn.1671-5403.2021.009.146
Key words:coronary disease  in-stent restenosis  risk factor This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China
Author NameAffiliationE-mail
YAN Qi-Kun Department of Cardiology, Second Medical Center,
Department of Clinical Medicine, Medical College of Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China 
fengcao8828@163.comreview 
WANG Ya-Bin Department of Cardiology, Second Medical Center,
National Clinical Research Center for Geriatric Diseases, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China 
fengcao8828@163.comreview 
CAO Feng Department of Cardiology, Second Medical Center,
National Clinical Research Center for Geriatric Diseases, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853, China 
fengcao8828@163.comreview 
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Abstract:
      Coronary heart disease (CHD) is one of the major diseases that seriously threaten human health, and its most commonly used treatment is percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, in-stent restenosis (ISR) after stent implantation is always a complication that confuses doctors and patients. At present the occurrence of ISR is believed to be associated with vascular intimal hyperplasia and neo-atherosclerosis, but its specific progression mechanism is still inconclusive. Therefore, preventive and therapeutic strategies for ISR remain unavailable. Studies have found that risk factors of ISR include lesion-related, interventionist-related and patient-related factors. Among them, ISR is especially associated with metabolic disorders such as diabetes, dyslipidemia and hyperuricemia in patients undergoing PCI after coronary heart disease. The risk of ISR in these patients is significantly increased but its early detection is still limitated. Development of technology and emerging technologies such as metabolomics in recent years have been widely used clinically and may play a more important role in the early diagnosis of ISR in the future.
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